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Pub Day Shout-Outs! for February 23, 2021, featuring Brina, de Rosnay, and Ryan

by Sara Voigt (@meaningfulmadness)


Here are three books coming out today that I'm excited to read!


Tatiana de Rosnay's Flowers of Darkness


Description from Publisher:

"From the internationally bestselling author of Sarah’s Key comes Tatiana de Rosnay’s Flowers of Darkness, a riveting and emotionally intense novel, set in a near future Paris, where a woman confronts past betrayal and present mystery.


"Author Clarissa Katsef is struggling to write her next book. She’s just snagged a brand new artist residency in an ultra-modern apartment, with a view of all of Paris, a dream for any novelist in search of tranquility. But since moving in, she has had the feeling of being watched. Is there reason to be paranoid? Or is her distraction and discomfort the result of her husband’s recent shocking betrayal? Or is that her beloved Paris lies altered outside her windows? A city that will never be quite the same, a city with a scar at its center?


"Stuck inside, in the midst of a sweltering heat wave, Clarissa enlists her beloved granddaughter in her investigation of the mysterious, high tech building even as she finds herself drawn back into the orbit of her first husband who is still the one who knows her most intimately, who shares the past grief that she has never quite let go.


"Staying true to her favorite themes―the imprint of the place, the weight of secrets―de Rosnay weaves an intrigue of thrilling suspense and emotional power."


Why I want to read it: I read Sarah's Key when it first came out, and I couldn't put it down. I know De Rosnay's ability to weave a story, so I am really anxious to dive into this one.

Elizabeth Miki Brina's Speak, Okinawa


Description from Publisher:

"A searing, deeply candid memoir about a young woman’s journey to understanding her complicated parents–her mother an Okinawan war bride, her father a Vietnam veteran–and her own, fraught cultural heritage.


"Elizabeth’s mother was working as a nightclub hostess on U.S.-occupied Okinawa when she met the American soldier who would become her husband. The language barrier and power imbalance that defined their early relationship followed them to the predominantly white, upstate New York suburb where they moved to raise their only daughter. There, Elizabeth grew up with the trappings of a typical American childhood and adolescence. Yet even though she felt almost no connection to her mother’s distant home, she also felt out of place among her peers. Decades later, Elizabeth comes to recognize the shame and self-loathing that haunt both her and her mother, and attempts a form of reconciliation, not only to come to terms with the embattled dynamics of her family but also to reckon with the injustices that reverberate throughout the history of Okinawa and its people. Clear-eyed and profoundly humane, Speak, Okinawa is a startling accomplishment–a heartfelt exploration of identity, inheritance, forgiveness, and what it means to be an American."


Why I want to read it: You know I love a memoir. This book sounds riveting. This is not a topic that I have read about extensively, and I am very interested in reading Elizabeth Miki Brina's work.

Jennifer Ryan's The Kitchen Front


Description from Publisher: "Two years into World War II, Britain is feeling her losses: The Nazis have won battles, the Blitz has destroyed cities, and U-boats have cut off the supply of food. In an effort to help housewives with food rationing, a BBC radio program called The Kitchen Front is holding a cooking contest—and the grand prize is a job as the program’s first-ever female co-host. For four very different women, winning the competition would present a crucial chance to change their lives.


"For a young widow, it’s a chance to pay off her husband’s debts and keep a roof over her children’s heads. For a kitchen maid, it’s a chance to leave servitude and find freedom. For a lady of the manor, it’s a chance to escape her wealthy husband’s increasingly hostile behavior. And for a trained chef, it’s a chance to challenge the men at the top of her profession.


"These four women are giving the competition their all—even if that sometimes means bending the rules. But with so much at stake, will the contest that aims to bring the community together only serve to break it apart?"


Why I want to read it: You know I love a book about food and friendships between women. This one sounds absolutely charming. I can't wait to get this one in my hands!

#pubdayshoutouts #fiction #contemporary #memoir

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Please note: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. We also partner with Bookshop.org and receive a small percentage of sales made from our Bookshop shelves.

© 2021 by Ashley, Jen, and Sara of Unabridged Podcast, LLC. All rights reserved.